Agile 2014 Interview with Troy Magennis

August 01, 2014 11:37 AM | COMMENTS (0) | CATEGORIES: agile, Agile 2014, agile metrics, agile2014, focused objective, Kanban, michael lewis, moneyball, oakland a's, Scrum, troy magennis

Focused Objective's Troy Magennis is at Agile 2014 to deliver a presentation called Moneyball for Software Projects: Agile Metrics for the Metrically Challenged. Agile Metrics are a very hot topic at Agile 2014 and Troy's approach is footed in something many of us who are statistically challenged (myself included) may find more accessible. Troy has taken many of the techniques used by Billy Beane and the Oakland A's that were featured in Michael Lewis' book Moneyball... (and yeah, there is a movie). In this interview Troy and I discuss his approach and how he's been working with it.  

One of the more impressive things Troy has done is come up with a way to use metrics to determine when Scrum will deliver best for you and when you should make the switch to Kanban.


Agile 2013 - Updates from the Biodome

August 05, 2013 11:01 PM | COMMENTS (0) | CATEGORIES: Active Listening, Agile, Agile 2013, Agile Atlas, Agile Manifesto, business value estimation, Chet Hendrickson, Chris Sims, Communication, David Bernstein, intuition, Jim Elvridge, Kanban, LeanKit, Monte Carlo Analysis, NLP, Non-violent communication, NVC, Questions, Ron Jeffries, SAFE, Scrum

Day 1 of Agile 2013 is in the books. There are over 1,700 Agilists who have gathered in the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville to sharpen up their skills in all things related to Agile. For those who are unable to attend, Projects at Work and BigVisible Solutions are co-sponsoring interviews with speakers, attendees and vendors who are participating in the event. Our goal is to provide updates for you throughout the event so that even if you weren't able to join us in the Gaylord Biosphere you will be able to keep pace with what's going on. For the rest of the week, keep checking back here for new interviews and show news brought to you by Projects at Work and BigVisible.

Here are some of the interviews we shot today:

Interview with Ron Jeffries and Chet Hendrickson on how well the Agile Manifesto has maintained it's applicability since it was created back in 2001 and an update on the Agile Atlas.

David Bernstein offers some details on his Agile 2013 presentation on how the kinds of questions we ask ourselves and others can help us become better collaborators, coaches, and impact our very quality of life.

Jim Elvridge explains the importance of not just relying on data and paying attention to you intuition in Agile.

 

 

A product update on LeanKit's new advanced predictive simulation features from CEO and co-founder Chris Hefley.

About Leankit

 

 

 

Chris Sims gives an update on the talks he is giving here in Nashville on Business Value Estimation in Agile and the importance of Active Listening.

 

 

We'll have lots more tomorrow, so keep checking back for more.


Personal Kanban - Lessons Learned

July 25, 2013 10:04 PM | COMMENTS (2) | CATEGORIES: Kanban, Kanban, personal kanban, personal productivity, productivity

“And now we're back
Where we started
Here we go round again
Day after day
I get up and I say
I better do it again”

Back Where We Started ~ The Kinks

It’s been seven months since I began using Personal Kanban. Initially I wanted to learn more about Kanban and also come up with a better way to cope with the massive amount of things I had waiting for me to do. I’ve definitely learned more about Kanban and my ability to manage the work I have to do in a much healthier way than I had before. Most of all, there were learnings that caught me by surprise.

  • Personal Kanban helped me get more clarity on what my workflow process actually is. It isn’t easy to be non-judgmental (with yourself) about this, but I believe that doing so is a very important part of understanding and improving.
  • Personal Kanban helped me come to the understanding that despite the pressure and stress I put on myself, there is almost nothing I have on my plate that I don’t actually really want to do. The hard part seems to be to keep that in mind all the time. It is something I still need more work on, but I do feel extremely fortunate in that respect.
  • Personal Kanban has allowed me to become more aware of the “waste” in my “system”. This has allowed me to make a conscious choice about what waste should remain and what should go. Some of the waste is an important part of my workflow and creative process.
  • I learned that one of they keys in my own management of work I have to do is to maintain a physical board with a limited amount of space in which to capture work to be done. I need to be able to see everything at once for it to be workable.

And now, seven months down the road, I am on the road to recreating the same mess in KanbanPad that I used to have in Things. Right now I have:

  • 15 items in my Backlog Queue
  • 16 items in my Someday Queue
  • 17 items in my On Deck Queue
  • 17 items in my Today Queue
  • 4 items in my Doing Queue

The biggest benefit of the last few months by far, is that I have become more aware of how I work and I am more aware of what I need to do to correct it.

When you begin studying certain forms of meditation you learn to count your breath. When thoughts arise you are to observe them, but not engage them. You just let them move on without getting caught up with them. If you do find that you are caught up, once you realize it, you let go and then refocus on your breath and start counting again. Not easy in the beginning, but the more you do it, the less difficult it becomes. My expectation is that working with Personal Kanban (or whatever approach is taken to getting work done) is similar. There are have periods where things go well and, and some, not so much. The trick is just to go back to the starting point and do it all again.

Time to make the donuts…


Personal Kanban - Lessons Learned

July 25, 2013 10:04 PM | COMMENTS (2) | CATEGORIES: Kanban, Kanban, personal kanban, personal productivity, productivity

“And now we're back
Where we started
Here we go round again
Day after day
I get up and I say
I better do it again”

Back Where We Started ~ The Kinks

It’s been seven months since I began using Personal Kanban. Initially I wanted to learn more about Kanban and also come up with a better way to cope with the massive amount of things I had waiting for me to do. I’ve definitely learned more about Kanban and my ability to manage the work I have to do in a much healthier way than I had before. Most of all, there were learnings that caught me by surprise.

  • Personal Kanban helped me get more clarity on what my workflow process actually is. It isn’t easy to be non-judgmental (with yourself) about this, but I believe that doing so is a very important part of understanding and improving.
  • Personal Kanban helped me come to the understanding that despite the pressure and stress I put on myself, there is almost nothing I have on my plate that I don’t actually really want to do. The hard part seems to be to keep that in mind all the time. It is something I still need more work on, but I do feel extremely fortunate in that respect.
  • Personal Kanban has allowed me to become more aware of the “waste” in my “system”. This has allowed me to make a conscious choice about what waste should remain and what should go. Some of the waste is an important part of my workflow and creative process.
  • I learned that one of they keys in my own management of work I have to do is to maintain a physical board with a limited amount of space in which to capture work to be done. I need to be able to see everything at once for it to be workable.

And now, seven months down the road, I am on the road to recreating the same mess in KanbanPad that I used to have in Things. Right now I have:

  • 15 items in my Backlog Queue
  • 16 items in my Someday Queue
  • 17 items in my On Deck Queue
  • 17 items in my Today Queue
  • 4 items in my Doing Queue

The biggest benefit of the last few months by far, is that I have become more aware of how I work and I am more aware of what I need to do to correct it.

When you begin studying certain forms of meditation you learn to count your breath. When thoughts arise you are to observe them, but not engage them. You just let them move on without getting caught up with them. If you do find that you are caught up, once you realize it, you let go and then refocus on your breath and start counting again. Not easy in the beginning, but the more you do it, the less difficult it becomes. My expectation is that working with Personal Kanban (or whatever approach is taken to getting work done) is similar. There are have periods where things go well and, and some, not so much. The trick is just to go back to the starting point and do it all again.

Time to make the donuts…


Personal Kanban Interview with Marcello Scacchetti from Jellybend.com

July 16, 2013 11:51 PM | COMMENTS (0) | CATEGORIES: commitment, ducks, jellybend, Kanban, marcello scacchetti, personal kanban, personal productivity, value stream mapping

Marcello Scacchetti lives, works and practices Personal Kanban in Italy. After a co-worker of mine posted on Yammer that he was using Marcello's Personal Kanban Google App, I reached out to him and he was kind enough to let me interview him about how he is using PK to manage his work and various projects.

Click here for the interview

While Marcello's approach towards Personal Kanban is a little different than my own, we have had similar learning experiences while using it. For Marcello, he says during the interview that Personal Kanban saved his life.

During the interview Marcello also talks about his use of Value Stream Mapping and how it has helped him with prioritizing the things he does (both inside and outside work). He also explains how he codes everything he does once it has been completed based on how much joy it brought him. (This is where I got the idea to do this with my own work - see the post here.) These are two of the factors that contribute to Marcello's practice of spending 80% of his time doing things that bring him as much joy as a kid feeding ducks.

I hope you will enjoy the interview. I got a number of ideas from Marcello that I applied to my Personal Kanban testing after we spoke.

If you'd like to learn more about Marcello, you can find him on twitter at @marcellonextrem on the Jellybend.com website.